In the News

Public Power Daily

Public Power Daily: Energy Northwest enters MOU tied to advanced reactor

“We initially met with Terrestrial Energy back in 2015. Right now, we’re focused on advising Terrestrial as they assess a site for commercial operation,” said Mike Paoli, a spokesman for Energy Northwest.
HBS Working Knowledge

HBS Working Knowledge: Why Private Investors Must Fund ‘New Nuclear’ Power Right Now

Professor Joseph Lassiter writes: "I have high hopes for the promising technology category known as 'new nuclear,' which offers the potential to dramatically reduce costs and rapidly ramp up installations when compared to today’s nuclear power plants.
MIT Technology Review

MIT Technology Review: Advanced nuclear technology just got a big green light from Congress

The US Senate has passed a bill that could accelerate the development of advanced nuclear reactors, providing a boost to technologies that promise to make nuclear power cheaper, safer, and easier to build...Startups, like Terrestrial Energy, are developing molten-salt reactors that should be safer and produce less waste.
Nikkei Asian Review

Nikkei: Bill Gates and China Spur Development of Next-Generation Reactors

Terrestrial says its 190,000-kilowatt reactor requires an upfront investment of less than $1 billion, resulting in kilowatt-per-hour costs of less than 5 cents, a price competitive with power from natural gas.

Terrestrial Energy’s Simon Irish at NY Times 2017 ClimateTECH

On November 30, 2017, Terrestrial Energy CEO Simon Irish explained why nuclear will be a clean energy solution to climate change at The New York Times’s 2017 ClimateTECH conference, with Lisa Friedman and Michael Shellenberger.

The New York Times

New York Times: How to Fix Global Warming: We Talk to Tech Innovators, Entrepreneurs and Political Leaders

I’ll be sitting down with Michael Shellenberger, founder of Environmental Progress, and Simon Irish, chief executive of Terrestrial Energy, to talk about the role of nuclear energy.
The Energy Collective

The Energy Collective: New Milestones Achieved for SMR Development

Terrestrial Energy, a developer of an advanced reactor design, has received notice from the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) that it has successfully completed the first phase of the CNSC’s pre-licensing vendor design review for its Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR) nuclear power plant design. Terrestrial Energy was the first advanced reactor vendor to enter the regulatory process in Canada, and now the first to have its design assessed.
CleanTech Canada

CleanTech Canada: Terrestrial Energy’s Molten Salt Nuclear Reactor Clears First Regulatory Hurdle

Terrestrial Energy’s next-generation nuclear power technology has taken its first steps toward securing a key regulatory approval that could take it from the drawing board to the commercial market. The Oakville, Ont.-based company, which has been working on a design for a new type of molten salt reactor since 2013, said last week that the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has completed the first phase of its review of the new reactor. The process, known as a vendor design review, lets the CNSC size up a company’s design before any official licensing steps are taken.
Power Technology

Power Technology: CNSC Evaluates Terrestrial Energy’s IMSR Nuclear Reactor

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has completed the first phase of a pre-licensing vendor design review of Terrestrial Energy’s Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR) nuclear power plant design. The review has verified that the design meets the basic requirements for a nuclear power plant in Canada.
Forbes

Forbes: A Successful Nuclear Step For New Molten Salt Reactors

Terrestrial Energy Inc. (TEI), a Canadian advanced nuclear reactor company, received notice yesterday from the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) that it successfully completed the first phase of the CNSC’s pre-licensing vendor design review for TEI’s new Integral Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR) nuclear power plant design. This design review allows the government to assess the design and determine whether any obvious issues exist that would stop the licensing process and that could be resolved before the licensing process actually started.